Connolly Elementary School

School Hours: 8:10 a.m. – 2:55 p.m.

Ridge Dr., Glen Cove, NY 11542
(516) 801-7310



Welcome to Our School

The Margaret  A. Connolly Elementary School was built in 1955 and was named for Miss Margaret A. Connolly who served as a teacher when the school opened its doors in 1955 (then called East School) and later as principal for 21 years. Her total years of service amounted to 25 years. The school is situated on 13 acres of land, and is located on Ridge Drive.

Currently, as part of the district's "Paired Plan," Connolly School serves Grade 3-5 students and is paired with Gribbin School (Grades K-2).

The Connolly School faculty and staff are dedicated to providing excellent opportunities for your child's educational and social growth. Our school's mission statement and instructional philosophy are supportive of these goals. Please feel free to contact the current principal, Mrs. Rosemarie Sekelsky, or any member of our staff at 801-7310.


Please note school hours for Connolly School for the 2014-2015 school year are 8:10 am -2:55 pm

 

Important Links


Current News

Mentoring Program Wraps Up at Connolly

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Connolly students in grades 3-5 took part in a mentoring program thanks to Glen Clove High School students.

The weekly visits were organized as part of Connolly’s Site Committee initiative, under the direction of the Glen Cove High School guidance counselor Francine Luke and Connolly fifth-grade teacher Maureen Hellman. During the meetings, which took place throughout the school year, students in grades 10-12 worked with the elementary students on building social relationships and becoming positive role models.
 

Scenes from Connolly School’s Carnival

Field Day at Connolly

Connolly School students enjoyed beautiful weather and fun activities at their Field Day celebration on May 29.

Physical education teacher George Kearnes organized the day’s events and directed students as they rotated from game-to game, including buddy walkers, a water sponge relay, sack races, Frisbee, castle ball and an egg on a spoon race, just to name a few.  

Students also enjoyed bottled water, watermelon and chips thanks to Connolly’s PTA members, who were on hand, serving students at the event. Principal Rosemarie Sekelsky expressed her thanks to PTA members and commended Kearnes on a job well done.

“Mr. Kearnes planned all of the events and did a wonderful job organizing the activities. The children had a great time.”

 

 

Student Council Members Clean Up

With gardening gloves and trowels in hand, members of Connolly’s Student Council worked to beautify the grounds surrounding their school.

The children, along with advisers Susan Stanco and Monique Vaccaro, planted marigolds donated by the City of Glen Cove Beautification Committee in flowerbeds around the front of the school, including those lining the walkway to the school’s entrance. The students also cleaned up around the school property as part of the project.   

“We really wanted to beautify the school, and we thought this was a great way to teach students to take care of their environment,” Vaccaro said.

 

International Feast Highlights Diversity

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Connolly School fifth-graders celebrated the completion of their research projects on North, Central and South American countries with an International Feast on June 3.

Students enjoyed multicultural music and traditional ethnic foods and desserts prepared by their parents. They also had an opportunity to view the research papers and posters created by their classmates, which were displayed on the walls of the cafeteria. Two of the fifth-grade classes used technology to enhance their research, producing and narrating iMovies about their country.       

Special education teacher Valerie Scicchitano said the theme of the project was learning and understanding different cultures, with a concentration on the rain forest, which tied into the social studies, English language arts and science curricula. Such projects, she explained, give students an opportunity to learn about how different people live.

“When they understand and accept other cultures, they are more likely to have empathy for others,” Scicchitano said.

Argentina Video

 

Hawaii Video


Columbia


Honduras




Wednesday, July 01, 2015
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